Lunker Hunter

Email Us | Fishing Forum | Store
subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link
subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link
subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link
subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link
subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link
subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link
subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link

Jig Fishing For Steelhead

small logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





 

 

 

Jig Fishing For Dummies

By: Greg Glossop


When you think of jigs you think of bass or crappie jigs. You would never think that you could catch the fish of a thousand casts on one. But the truth is if you are using a jig/float and presenting it the right way, it will be the fish of 500 casts instead. Now when you use jigs you need to think about the water conditions, what type of water your fishing, and what time of the year it is. Soon you will be able to take some of the basics of jig fishing and use this tactic to hook up with some of those chrome bright, drag screaming, somersaulting steelhead, and maybe you might get the big one.

 

Basic Setup

First off you need to get the right rod/reel setup. Most of the time a 10'6" medium rod rated for 4-8 or 6-10, a 9'6" rod will work too. You will also need a reel that will be able to hold a good amount of line to insure that you won't get spooled when the steelie goes for a run, I would recommend an Abu Garcia Cardinal or one of various Shimano spinning reels. Now line, line is your preference but a good choice is 20lb. Power Pro braided line. Why this is, is because braid floats, the 20lb. braid is in a 6lb. monofilament line diameter which means you will be able to fit more on a spool then say 10lb. mono, and braid floats unlike mono.

 

Where to target steelhead

When it comes down to jigs and floats to use you got to remember two things, that this particular setup works great in deep slots from 4 to 12 feet of water and that if you fish jigs for a while and get take downs from a certain jig pattern continuously, that you might want to stick to that jig or mix up that pattern a little. The water you want to target when fishing jigs is like I said 4 to 12 feet of water or water like this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you see the rip rap then that slightly calm on the other side of the rip rap, the fish are going to hold either in the rip rap behind boulders or on the edge of the rip rap to either sit or to move up in the hole. When you fish these types of holes you want to cast well upstream from the main hole so you actually fish the hole instead of trying to get your float to sit upright while trying to fish the hole itself.

 

Summer Steelhead

 

There are a variety of jigs out there you can you use for steelhead. For summer steelhead (June thru October) you want to use smaller jigs than you would for winters, so saying that you also want to use darker jigs too, like:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The reason you want to use smaller, darker jigs is because when the water is lower like it during summer steelhead season, the steelhead are usually more skittish, so you want to present them with a darker smaller pattern. There are also some patterns out there that produce steelhead like "The Dreaded Nightmare" Jig:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Another good one to tie is a rusty reddish-brown colored jig too. You primarily want to use a 1/8 th or 1/16 th ounce jig head, some use smaller. When people rig up for the summer steelhead most people will usually use a fixed 1 ½ inch diameter cork float.

 

Winter Steelhead

 

Winter steelhead are a totally different fish then the summer steelhead, these fish have the shoulders, they lay any where they want, they smack anything they want, these fish do anything they please. Usually during the winter the water is a little higher up then it is during the summer so this means heavier weight, I usually try to stick with 1/8 th ounce jig heads but some go to 1/4 oz . The setup for winter steelhead is totally different then it is during the summer, you could use the same setup for summers with winters. So here are a couple setups:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So generally speaking this setup is easier said then done. While you are trying to get you float to sit upright you have to worry about mending it too, that is why some guys use braid just for that reason, it is a lot easier to mend.

Another thing you can do to make your chances of hooking up is to add a pink worm just like this:

 

Look for more articles in the future!!!

 

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to drop me a line at:

icewater516@hotmail.com

 

About Us | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | ©2007 Lunker Hunter Magazine